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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of proximity of herbicide and mechanical management on use of strutting grounds by male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus in Montana, USA

Published source details

Wallestad R. (1975) Male sage grouse responses to sagebrush treatment. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 39, 482-484


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manually control or remove midstorey and ground-level vegetation (including mowing, chaining, cutting etc) in shrubland Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled before-and-after study in 1968-1970 in sagebrush Artemisia tridentate shrubland in central Montana, USA (Wallestad 1975), found that the number of strutting male greater sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus increased by 28% at three lekking sites within 0.5 km of areas treated with herbicide and mechanical clearing, whilst numbers fell by 63% at a fourth site. Numbers increased by 323% at two leks more than 4 km from treated areas.

 

Apply herbicide to mid- and understorey vegetation Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled before-and-after study in 1968-1970 in common sagebrush shrubland in central Montana, USA (Wallestad 1975), found that the number of strutting male greater sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus increased by 28% at three lekking sites within 0.5 km of areas treated with herbicide and mechanical clearing, whilst numbers fell by 63% at a fourth site. Numbers increased by 323% at two leks more than 4 km from treated areas. In June 1968, three areas (totalling 705 ha) (each with a lek within 0.5 km) were treated with herbicide (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) or mechanically cleared in alternate strips. A fourth area (441 ha) within 0.5 km of a lek was treated in June 1970.