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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Greater prairie chicken Tympanuchus cupido responses to changing booming-ground cover type and height, Portage and Wood Counties, Wisconsin, USA

Published source details

Anderson R.K. (1969) Prairie chicken responses to changing booming-ground cover type and height. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 33, 636-643


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Manually control or remove midstorey and ground-level vegetation (including mowing, chaining, cutting etc) in shrubland Bird Conservation

A replicated before-and-after study in 1962-1963 in shrubland in Wisconsin, USA (Anderson 1969), found that male prairie chickens Tympanuchus cupido showed a preference for mown areas over controls when the original height of vegetation was over 15 cm (between four and 31 birds using each of five areas before mowing vs. 8-85 after), but not if it was shorter (7-45 birds using five areas before mowing vs. 12-69 birds after).

 

Use prescribed burning on shrublands Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in shrubland in 1962-1963 in Wisconsin, USA (Anderson 1969), found that the number of male prairie chickens Tympanuchus cupido displaying at a site increased from seven to 13 following prescribed burning. However, the authors note that the number at other sites without burning also increased over the period, (by a single male each time).

 

Plant trees to act as windbreaks Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in shrubland in 1962-1964 in Wisconsin, USA (Anderson 1969), found that the erection of a windbreak of 4 m high pines Pinus spp. appeared to disrupt lekking behaviour in male greater prairie chickens Tympanuchus cupido, with several males vacating their territories after trees were erected nearby.