Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of management for red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis on bird species that use early-successional scrub habitat at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

Published source details

Krementz D.G. & Christie J.S. (1999) Scrub-successional bird community dynamics in young and mature longleaf pine-wiregrass savannahs. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 63, 803-814


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Clearcut and re-seed forests Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 1995-1996 in pine Pinus spp. savanna in South Carolina, USA (Krementz & Christie 1999), found that stands managed for red-cockaded woodpeckers Picoides borealis held fewer scrub-successional species than stands where non-native pines were removed and replanted with longleaf pines Pinus palustris (31-36 species in managed stands vs. 54-55 in replanted stands). However, no differences in survival rates were apparent for Bachman's sparrow Aimophila aestivalis (a near-threatened species), indigo bunting Passerina cyanea, and combined scrub-successional birds between stand types. Management for woodpeckers involved tree thinning, midstory tree removal and burning.

 

Thin trees within forests Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 1995-1996 in pine savanna in South Carolina, USA (Krementz & Christie 1999), found that there were fewer scrub-successional species in stands managed for red-cockaded woodpeckers (including tree thinning) than in stands which were clearcut to remove non-native pines and replanted with longleaf pines Pinus palustris. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Clearcut and re-seed forests’.

 

Use prescribed burning on pine forests Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 1995-1996 in pine savanna in South Carolina, USA (Krementz & Christie 1999), found that there were fewer scrub-successional species in stands managed for red-cockaded woodpeckers (including prescribed burning) than in stands which were clearcut to remove non-native pines and replanted with longleaf pines Pinus palustris. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Clearcut and re-seed forests’.

 

Manually control or remove midstorey and ground-level vegetation (including mowing, chaining, cutting etc) in forests Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 1995-1996 in pine savanna in South Carolina, USA (Krementz & Christie 1999), found that there were fewer scrub-successional species in stands managed for red-cockaded woodpeckers (including midstorey thinning) than in stands which were clearcut to remove non-native pines and replanted with longleaf pines Pinus palustris. This study is discussed in ‘Clearcut and re-seed forests’.