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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Breeding bird response to riparian buffer width in managed Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii forest in Washington, USA

Published source details

Pearson S.F. & Manuwal D.A. (2001) Breeding bird response to riparian buffer width in managed Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Ecological Applications, 11, 840-853


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide or retain un-harvested buffer strips Bird Conservation

A replicated controlled before-and-after study in a managed Douglas-fir Pseudotsuga menziesii forest in Washington, USA, (Pearson & Manuwal 2001), found that 31 m wide riparian buffer strips contained bird communities that were more similar to control (unharvested) forests than 14 m strips. Forest species (black-throated grey warbler Dendroica nigrescens, golden-crowned kinglet Regulus satrapa and brown creeper Certhia americana) decreased in buffer treatments (especially the narrow buffer) relative to controls. Species of shrubby habitats (dark-eyed junco Junco hyemalis, cedar waxwing Bombycilla cedrorum and song sparrow Melospiza melodia) increased in one or both buffer treatments. Birds were surveyed in 18 sites (six of each treatment) in both pre-harvest (spring 1993) and post-harvest (1995 and 1996) years.