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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of group-selection and seed-tree cuts by three early-successional migratory species in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA

Published source details

Alterman L.E., Bednarz J.C. & Thill R.E. (2005) Use of group-selection and seed-tree cuts by three early-successional migratory species in Arkansas. The Wilson Bulletin, 117, 353-363


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use selective harvesting/logging instead of clearcutting Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 2000-2001 in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA (Alterman et al. 2005), found that three early-successional species were more abundant in three ‘seed-tree’ stands (10-25 mature trees left/ha), compared to in the openings made by group-selection harvesting (typically 10% of stand cut every 10 years in patches of 0.8 ha or less). This study is discussed in detail in ‘Clear or open patches in forests’.

 

Clear or open patches in forests Bird Conservation

In Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA, a replicated study (Alterman et al. 2005) found that three species of songbird known to favour early-successional habitats were all more abundant in three ‘seed-tree’ stands (10-25 mature trees left/ha), compared to in the openings made by group-selection harvesting (typically 10% of stand cut every 10 years in patches of 0.8 ha or less): indigo bunting (54 nests and 31% success in seed-tree stands vs. 28 and 42% in group-selection stands); yellow-breasted chat (50 nests and 31% success vs. two and 0%) and prairie warbler (14 nests with 45% success, all in seed-tree stands). The authors conclude that group-selection openings appeared too small to support nesting yellow-breasted chat and prairie warbler. Nests were monitored in May-August 2000-2001, within three-, six- and seven-year-old openings created by the two management techniques.