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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of patch-burn and traditional management on dickcissel Spiza americana nest success in a tallgrass prairie in Oaklahoma, USA

Published source details

Churchwell R.T., Davis C.A., Fuhlendor S.D. & Engle D.M. (2008) Effects of patch-burn management on dickcissel nest success in a tallgrass prairie. Journal of Wildlife Management, 72, 1596-1604


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Employ grazing in natural grasslands Bird Conservation

A study in Oklahoma, USA, in 2003-2004 (Churchwell et al. 2008), found that dickcissel reproductive success was lower in grazed and burned pastures compared to on tallgrass prairie managed by patch-burns. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.

 

Use prescribed burning on grasslands Bird Conservation

A study in Oklahoma, USA, in 2003-2004 (Churchwell et al. 2008), found that dickcissel reproductive success was lower in traditionally-managed pastures (annual burning followed by early-intensive grazing) compared to patch-burn management of tallgrass prairie. Dickcissels (296 nests monitored) tended to start nesting later, but nest densities were higher, in traditionally managed pasture. The average number of eggs per clutch and fledglings produced were similar between treatments. Predation was the main cause of nest failure and was higher in the traditionally managed pastures, as was parasitism by brown-headed cowbird Molothrus ater.