Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of grazing and burning on densities and habitats of breeding Anas ducks in Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, USA

Published source details

Kruse A.D. & Bowen B.S. (1996) Effects of prairie grazing and burning on densities and habitats of breeding ducks in North Dakota. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 60, 233-246


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Employ grazing in natural grasslands Bird Conservation

A randomised, controlled, replicated before-and-after study in 1980-1988 in mixed-grass prairie at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, USA (Kruse & Bowen 1996), found that nest densities of gadwall Anas strepera and blue-winged teal were lower in areas and years with spring cattle grazing, or a combination of grazing and summer burning compared to control areas. Five other species did not show a response to grazing. Nest success was generally high (31-45%) and unaffected by treatment. The authors argue that grazing reduced brush cover that provided nesting habitat for ducks.

 

Use prescribed burning on grasslands Bird Conservation

A randomised, controlled, replicated before-and-after study in 1980-1988 in mixed-grass prairie at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, USA (Kruse & Bowen 1996), found that nest densities of gadwall Anas strepera (but not six other duck species) were lower in areas and years with summer burning (and for several years after) compared to control areas. Densities of gadwall and blue-winged teal A. discors were also lower in areas with a combination of burning and spring cattle grazing. Nest success was generally high (31-45%) and unaffected by treatment. The authors argue that grazing reduced brush cover that provided nesting habitat for ducks.