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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Responses of breeding birds in tallgrass prairie to fire and cattle grazing at Konza Prairie Research Natural Area, Kansas, USA

Published source details

Powell A.F.L.A. (2008) Responses of breeding birds in tallgrass prairie to fire and cattle grazing. Journal of Field Ornithology, 79, 41-52


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Employ grazing in natural grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 2002-2003 (Powell 2008) at the same tallgrass prairie site in Kansas, USA, as in (9), found that three of seven species surveyed showed significant responses to low-intensity cattle grazing: upland sandpipers, grasshopper sparrows, and eastern meadowlarks were more abundant in grazed areas, whilst Henslow's sparrow, dickcissel, brown-headed cowbird (all grassland species) and Bell's vireo showed no response.

 

Use prescribed burning on grasslands Bird Conservation

A replicated study in 2002-2003 (Powell 2008) at the same tallgrass prairie site in Kansas, USA, as in (14), found that all seven bird species surveyed showed a significant response to burning: upland sandpipers were more abundant in the breeding season following a burn, whilst Henslow's sparrow, grasshopper sparrow, dickcissel, eastern meadowlark, brown-headed cowbird (all grassland species) and Bell's vireo (a shrub-dependent species) were less abundant or absent. Grasshopper and Henslow’s sparrows, and meadowlark were more abundant in areas not burned the preceding spring, and less abundant at sites burned every four years. Bell’s vireo was commonest at sites burned every four years.