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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Winter bird use of seed-rich habitats in agri-environment schemes in Aberdeenshire and Moray, Scotland

Published source details

Perkins A.J., Maggs H.E. & Wilson J.D. (2008) Winter bird use of seed-rich habitats in agri-environment schemes. Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 126, 189-194


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Bird Conservation

A replicated experiment in northeast Scotland over three winters (2002-2005) (Perkins et al. 2008), found that unharvested seed-bearing crops were most frequently selected by birds (28% of all birds despite these patches occupying less than 5% of the area surveyed). For nine species, seed-bearing crops were used more than expected (based on available crop area) in at least one winter. Outside agri-environment schemes (the Rural Stewardship Scheme and Farmland Bird Lifeline), cereal stubble was the most selected habitat.  In total, 53 lowland farms (23 in Rural Stewardship Scheme, 14 in Farmland Bird Lifeline, and 16 not in a scheme were assessed. Over 36,000 birds of 10 species were recorded.

 

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture Farmland Conservation

A replicated experiment in northeast Scotland over three winters 2002-2005 (Perkins et al. 2008), found that unharvested seed-bearing crops were most frequently selected by birds (28% of all birds despite these patches occupying less than 5% of the area surveyed). For nine species, seed-bearing crops were used more than expected (based on available crop area) in at least one winter. Outside agri-environment schemes (the Rural Stewardship Scheme and Farmland Bird Lifeline), cereal stubble was the most selected habitat. In total, 53 lowland farms (23 in Rural Stewardship Scheme, 14 in Farmland Bird Lifeline, and 16 not in a scheme) were assessed. Over 36,000 birds of 10 species were recorded.