Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: House mouse Mus musculus eradication by aerial bait application on Adele, Tonga and Fisherman Islands, Abel Tasman National Park, New Zealand

Published source details

Golding C. (2010) House mouse Mus musculus eradication by aerial bait application on Adele, Tonga and Fisherman Islands, Abel Tasman National Park, New Zealand. Conservation Evidence, 7, 62-68

Summary

Aerial application of cereal bait containing the poison brodifacoum was used to eradicate house mice Mus musculus from three islands in the Abel Tasman National Park, New Zealand, during July and August 2007. Poison bait was spread onto the islands by a helicopter using an under slung bait-spreading bucket and applied at a rate of 4 kg per hectare with a 50 % overlap in swath width. This gave an effective application rate of 8 kg per hectare. Bait was applied to the islands in two separate applications, 31 days apart. Monitoring for mice was carried out on all three islands for two years following the eradication attempt to determine the outcome. No mice or any sign of mice was detected. Eradicating mice from Tonga Island, Adele Island and Fisherman Island was the final step towards making the three islands free of introduced mammalian predators.