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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of sandplain revegetation on avian abundance and diversity at Skogasandur and Myrdalssandur, South-Iceland

Published source details

Gunnarsson T.G. & Indridadottir G.H. (2009) Effects of sandplain revegetation on avian abundance and diversity at Skogasandur and Myrdalssandur, South-Iceland. Conservation Evidence, 6, 98-104


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Restore or create grasslands Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in southern Iceland in 2009 (Gunnarsson & Indridadottir 2009) found that eight species of birds were found in the study site following the revegetating of ‘sandplains’, but no birds were found in barren sandplains or strips of lyme grass Leymus arenarius. Meadow pipits Anthus pratensis, common snipe Gallinago gallinago and redshank Tringa totanus were the most common species and found at highest abundances in dense areas of Nootka lupin Lupinus nootkathensis (210 meadow pipits/km2, 46 snipe/km2 and 19 redshank/km2 vs. 83 pipits/km2 and 13 snipe/km2 in areas of scattered lupins). Only meadow pipits were found in any habitat without lupins. Revegetation began in earnest in 1988, when areas were sown with lyme grass (65 kg seeds/ha), followed by lupin strips from 1992 (4 kg seeds/ha) and non-native grasses. All treatments except lupins were also fertilised.