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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Comparing the benefits to wintering birds of oil-seed rape establishment by broadcast and non-inversion tillage at Grange Farm, Cambridgeshire, England

Published source details

Dillon I.A., Morris A.J. A.J. & Bailey C.M. (2009) Comparing the benefits to wintering birds of oil-seed rape establishment by broadcast and non-inversion tillage at Grange Farm, Cambridgeshire, England. Conservation Evidence, 6, 18-25


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce tillage Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled study in the winters of 2006-8 in four (2006-7) and two (2007-8) fields of winter oilseed rape on a single farm in Cambridgeshire, UK (Dillon et al. 2009), found that bird densities were similar between non-inversion tillage and control fields. Neither individual species nor groups of species responded to differences in crop establishment. However, the Farmland Bird Index (which included omnivores, carnivores, insect-eating birds and seed-eating species) was significantly higher on control fields. The authors point out that the overall densities on both treatments were still relatively low compared to other interventions (such as wild bird seed and over-winter cereal stubble). Two surveys were made in each field each month between September-March across the whole field area.

 

Reduce tillage Farmland Conservation

A replicated trial in the winters of 2006-2008 in four (2006-2007) and two (2007-2008) fields (located on one farm) of winter oilseed rape Brassica napus crops in Cambridgeshire, UK (Dillon et al. 2009) found that bird densities were similar between oilseed rape established using two different methods of reduced tillage (non-inversion tillage and broadcasting). Neither individual species nor groups of species (seed-eaters, probers) responded to differences in crop establishment. However, a Farmland Bird Index (which included omnivorous, carnivorous, insect-eating and seed-eating species) was significantly higher on broadcast oilseed rape fields. The authors point out that the overall densities on both treatments were still relatively low compared to other interventions (such as wild bird seed and overwinter cereal stubble). Two surveys were made in each field each month between September-March across the whole field area.