Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Translocation of North Island saddleback Philesturnus rufusater from Tiritiri Matangi Island to Motuihe Island, New Zealand

Published source details

Parker K.A. & Laurence J. (2008) Translocation of North Island saddleback Philesturnus rufusater from Tiritiri Matangi Island to Motuihe Island, New Zealand. Conservation Evidence, 5, 47-50


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate songbirds Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study on Motuihe Island, New Zealand (Parker & Laurence 2008), found that survival of 20 saddlebacks Philesturnus carunculatus (formely North Island saddlebacks P. rufusater) translocated from Matangi Island in August 2005, was 70% for the first year, with at least 11 chicks fledged. The reintroduction was one part of a management project for Motuihe Island, including the eradication of brown rats Rattus norvegicus, house mice Mus musculus, European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus and feral cats Felis catus between 1997 and 2002. Extensive planting of native vegetation also took place from 2003-8. Birds were housed for 1-3 days in an aviary (8 x 5 x 3.5 m) before transport, with no mortalities during captivity and transport. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’.

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for songbirds Bird Conservation

A study on Motuihe Island, New Zealand (Parker & Laurence 2008), found that only two of 150 nest boxes provided were used by 20 North Island saddleback Philesturnus rufusater translocated from Matangi Island in August 2005. Saddlebacks also preferred natural cavities over the 110 roosting boxes put out prior to release. The success of the translocation is discussed in ‘Translocate individuals’.