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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Captive management of newly hatched Fijian ground frog Platymantis vitianus froglets: lessons learnt from an unanticipated invertebrate predator invasion, Suva, Fiji

Published source details

Narayan E., Christi K. & Morley C. (2007) Captive management of newly hatched Fijian ground frog Platymantis vitianus froglets: lessons learnt from an unanticipated invertebrate predator invasion, Suva, Fiji. Conservation Evidence, 4, 58-60


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Captive breeding frogs Amphibian Conservation

A small, replicated study in 2006 of the Fijian ground frog Platymantis vitianus at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji (Narayan, Christi & Morley 2007) found that although all five froglets that hatched survived to 37 days old, they were then predated by brown house ants Pheidole megacephala. All froglets maintained their body weight and on average, weight and body length gradually increased. Ants were likely to have been attracted by excess ripe fruit placed in the aquarium to attract small flies as food for the froglets. Adult frogs laid eggs during the wet season in a purpose-built outdoor enclosure. The five newly hatched froglets were then transferred into a glass laboratory aquarium (0.5 x 0.3 x 0.4 m). Body weight and food supply were closely monitored.