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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of cutting and burning of heather Calluna vulgaris on fungal fruiting in Caledonian pine forest at Abernethy Forest RSPB reserve, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Published source details

Amphlett A., Holden E., Allcorn R. R.I & Gurney M. (2006) Effects of cutting and burning of heather Calluna vulgaris on fungal fruiting in Caledonian pine forest at Abernethy Forest RSPB reserve, Inverness-shire, Scotland. Conservation Evidence, 3, 106-108

Summary

In a Caledonian pine forest in the Scottish Highlands, the effects of cutting and burning on fungal fruiting differed between species, and especially between mycorrhizal and decomposer species. Mycorrhizal species seem to fruit more abundantly in cut or burned areas, whereas fewer decomposers fruit under these treatments. This suggests that burning or cutting small areas could help increase fruiting fungi diversity, but that it should probably be avoided in areas where important litter decomposer species occur. Most fruiting records were from control plots, there was just over a 50% decline in the number of fungal fruit bodies in the burnt and cut plots.