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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Changes in bird use following the managed realignment at Freiston Shore RSPB Reserve, Lincolnshire, England

Published source details

Badley R. & Allcorn R.I. (2006) Changes in bird use following the managed realignment at Freiston Shore RSPB Reserve, Lincolnshire, England. Conservation Evidence, 3, 102-105


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Restore or create coastal and intertidal wetlands Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study at Freiston Shore, Lincolnshire, England (Bradley & Allcorn 2006), found that the number of wildfowl and little egrets Egretta garzetta using the site increased from 426 and one, respectively to 2,659 and 14 between 2002-2003 and 2005-2006. This followed the breaching of the sea wall at the site, allowing the flooding of 66 ha of land in 2002. By September 2005, 70% of the area was covered in salt marsh plants. However, the number of waders at the site decreased from 11,012 to 7,799 over the same period, and the authors note that the regular inundation with salt water prevents waders from breeding. Songbirds showed mixed responses: Eurasian skylarks Alauda arvensis increased from an average of 16 birds to 121; four species increased by smaller amounts; three species showed uncertain trends; meadow pipits Anthus pratensis declined.