Study

The effectiveness of different methods to deter large gulls Larus spp. from competing with nesting terns Sterna spp. on Coquet Island RSPB reserve, Northumberland, England

  • Published source details Morrison P. & Allcorn R.I. (2006) The effectiveness of different methods to deter large gulls Larus spp. from competing with nesting terns Sterna spp. on Coquet Island RSPB reserve, Northumberland, England. Conservation Evidence, 3, 84-87

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Reduce inter-specific competition for nest sites of ground nesting seabirds by removing competitor species

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Reduce inter-specific competition for nest sites of ground nesting seabirds by removing competitor species

    A study on Coquet Island (5.4 ha) in 2000-5 in northeast England (Morrison & Allcorn 2006) found that a gas gun, scarecrows, bird-scaring rockets, taped distress calls and human disturbance were all effective in deterring herring gulls Larus argentatus and lesser black-backed gulls L. Fuscus from disrupting common tern Sterna hirundo breeding. However, a ‘humming line’ (two strips of plastic that vibrate in the wind), a gird of plastic string designed to stop birds settling and a ‘scarer rope’ (a slow burning rope with a series of explosives attached) all had practical issues: the humming line broke, gulls became entangled in the string grid and the rope was difficult to light in wet weather and scared common eiders Somateria mollissima from their nests. The consequences of these measures are discussed below.

     

Output references

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