Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Reintroduction of the critically endangered Campbell Island teal Anas nesiotis to Campbell Island, New Zealand

Published source details

McClelland P. & Gummer H. (2006) Reintroduction of the critically endangered Campbell Island teal Anas nesiotis to Campbell Island, New Zealand. Conservation Evidence, 3, 61-63


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate wildfowl Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study on Campbell Island, New Zealand, in 2004-5 (McClelland & Gummer 2006) investigated the success of a joint translocation/reintroduction programme, which transferred 44 wild and 61 captive-bred Campbell Island teal Anas nesiotis to the island. Between 75% and 78% of birds survived and breeding occurred. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Release captive-bred individuals’.

 

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of wildfowl Bird Conservation

A reintroduction programme on Campbell Island, New Zealand, in 2004-5 (McClelland & Gummer 2006) found that at least 78% (2004) and 75% (2005) of 105 Campbell Island teal Anas nesiotis survived reintroduction or translocation. The birds also bred in 2006, with at least two nests and four young being produced. Forty-four of the released birds were wild-caught (see ‘Translocate individuals’) and 61 captive bred. All birds were kept individually or in pairs for 2-10 days in small holding pens on Campbell Island and provided with food before being released into the wild.