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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The use of ground disturbance techniques to manage perennial knawel Scleranthus perennis prostratus in the Brecklands of north Suffolk, England

Published source details

Leonard Y. (2006) The use of ground disturbance techniques to manage perennial knawel Scleranthus perennis prostratus in the Brecklands of north Suffolk, England. Conservation Evidence, 3, 19-21

Summary

The endemic subspecies of perennial knawel Scleranthus perennis prostratus is a declining plant found only in the Breckland area of eastern England. In 1992, at a locality where perennial knawel had been recorded in 1985, the ground was disturbed using a vibrating subsoiler. As a result of this soil disturbance, in 1994 two plants appeared. From seeds of these plants, seedlings were propagated and transplanted. After initial success the population dwindled and none were observed in 2005, additional mature plants were therefore planted. It is believed that the basic soil pH (7.5) and herbicide drift from neighbouring fields has been deleterious to the site and reduced habitat suitability for perennial knawel.