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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Predator control to increase breeding success of Chatham Island oystercatcher Haematopus chathamensis, Chatham Island, New Zealand

Published source details

Moore P. (2005) Predator control to increase breeding success of Chatham Island oystercatcher Haematopus chathamensis, Chatham Island, New Zealand. Conservation Evidence, 2, 80-82


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Control mammalian predators on islands for waders Bird Conservation

A controlled before-and-after study on Chatham Island (899 km2), New Zealand between 1999 and 2005 (Moore 2005) found that the number of Chatham Island oystercatchers Haematopus chathamensis breeding in a 14 km stretch of beach increased from 16 to 35 pairs over the study period, following the initiation of control (trapping and shooting) of predators, principally feral cats Felis catus, but also other introduced mammals and weka Gallirallus australis. Birds in the management area fledged 18-35 chicks/year, compared with very low fledging success in unmanaged areas.