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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Artificial feeding to attract wild birds close to a viewing area at Belfast Lough RSPB Reserve, Antrim, Northern Ireland

Published source details

McGeehan A. (2005) Artificial feeding to attract wild birds close to a viewing area at Belfast Lough RSPB Reserve, Antrim, Northern Ireland. Conservation Evidence, 2, 28-29


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary food for waders to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A study at a wetland reserve in Northern Ireland (McGeehan 2005) found that black-tailed godwits Limosa limosa and northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus fed on millet seeds provided near a viewing area. Feeding was only possible, however, after a switch from ‘Wildbird Mix’ seed – which was eaten by mallards Anas platyrhynchos that then dominated other feeders and chased them off. The reaction of wildfowl to feeding is discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival – Wildfowl’.

 

Provide supplementary food for wildfowl to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A study in a wetland reserve in Northern Ireland (McGeehan 2005) found that mallards Anas platyrhynchos were attracted to, and ate, ‘Wildbird Mix’ seeds provided. However, they dominated and excluded other species, so the mix was replaced with white millet seed. This was too small for mallard to eat, and so other species such as wigeon A. penelope and teal A. crecca were able to feed. The reaction of waders to the same feeding activity is discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival – Waders’.