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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Captive breeding and release of the endangered pink pigeon Columba mayeri into the upland forests of Mauritius

Published source details

Jones C. G., Swinnerton K. J., Taylor C. J. & Mungroo Y. (1992) The release of captive-bred pink pigeons Columba mayeri in native forest on Mauritius. A progress report July 1987-June 1992. Dodo, 28, 92-125


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of pigeons Bird Conservation

A review of a pink pigeon Nesoenas mayeri (formerly Columba mayeri) release programme in mixed forest habitats at Black River Gorges in southern Mauritius between 1987 and 1992 (Jones et al. 1992) found that 36% of 42 pigeons were known to be alive one year after release. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’, ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Provide supplementary food after release’ and ‘Predator control on islands’.

 

Control mammalian predators on islands for pigeons Bird Conservation

A before-and-after trial in ‘Pigeon Wood’ (mixed forests), Black River Gorges National Park, Mauritius in 1989-91 (Jones et al. 1992) found that fewer pink pigeon Nesoenas mayeri (formerly Columba mayeri) nest were predated by rats Rattus spp. in 1992 (12% of eight nests predated), compared to in 1989-90 (32% of 22 nests predated, following the initiation of systematic rat control (using brodifacoum bait stations). This study is also discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’, ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Release captive bred individuals’ and ‘Provide supplementary food after release’ and ‘Predator control on islands’.

 

Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations of pigeons Bird Conservation

A review of a captive-breeding programme on Mauritius (Jones et al. 1992) found that at least 40 pink pigeons, Nesoenas mayeri (formerly Columba mayeri), were successfully bred in captivity, fostered under African collared doves, Streptopelia roseogrisea, (formerly S. risoria) and released. A further two birds were raised at the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust (Jersey, UK) and released. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’, ‘Release captive bred individuals’, ‘Provide supplementary food after release’ and ‘Predator control on islands’.

 

Provide supplementary food for pigeons to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A study in mixed forests on Mauritius between July 1987 and June 1992 (Jones et al. 1992) found that, of 42 captive-bred pink pigeons Nesoenas mayeri (formerly Columba mayeri) released, 16 visited feeders and spent an average of 20.5 mins/day feeding. However, when food provision stopped, only two birds were seen visiting the feeder, suggesting that they could survive without it. Non-native birds also used the feeder but they did not exclude pigeons. Food consisted of mixture of maize, wheat, canary seed, millet, lentils, and occasionally peas and other seeds provided from a hopper outside the release aviary and was provided from June until December 1987. The amount provided was then reduced and the finally stopped, until more pigeons were released in June 1988 and continued until at least 1992. This study is also discussed in ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Release captive bred individuals’, ‘Provide supplementary food after release’ and ‘Predator control on islands’.

 

Provide supplementary food after release Bird Conservation

A replicated study in mixed forests in Mauritius in 1987-91 (Jones et al. 1992) found that 61% of 44 released captive pink pigeons Nesoenas mayeri (formerly Columba mayeri) continued to use a supplementary feeding station at the release site one month after release. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’, ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Release captive bred individuals’ and ‘Predator control on islands.’