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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Providing supplementary food as a conservation initiative for twite Carduelis flavirostris breeding in the South Pennines near Worsthorne, Lancashire, England

Published source details

Raine A. (2004) Providing supplementary food as a conservation initiative for twite Carduelis flavirostris breeding in the South Pennines near Worsthorne, Lancashire, England. Conservation Evidence, 1, 23-25


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide supplementary food for birds or mammals Farmland Conservation

A study at a farmland site in northwest England between January 2003 and February 2004 (Raine 2004a) found that twite Carduelis flavirostris used a supplementary feeding station (established in spring 2002) frequently outside the breeding season, with up to 250 birds seen at once. However, twite used the station far less during the breeding season, when they relied more on wild seeds. Birds from another feeding station (see (Raine 2004b)) and other breeding colonies up to 20 km away used the feeding station, as well as individuals from a nearby colony of 20-30 birds. Supplementary food consisted of nyjer Guizotia abyssinca seed spread in a thick 2 m x 5 cm line on a 2 m x 2 m patch of bare earth and replenished every week. This study was part of the same experimental set-up as (Raine 2004b, Raine 2004c).

 

Provide supplementary food for songbirds to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A study at a farmland site in northwest England between January 2003 and February 2004 (Raine 2004) found that twite Carduelis flavirostris used a supplementary feeding station (established in spring 2002) frequently outside the breeding season, with up to 250 birds being seen at once. However, twite used the station far less during the breeding season, when they relied more on wild seeds. Birds from another feeding station (see Raine 2004) and other breeding colonies up to 20 km away used the feeding station, as well as individuals from a nearby colony of 20-30 birds. Supplementary food consisted of nyjer Guizotia abyssinca spread in a thick 2 m x 5 cm line on a 2 m x 2 m patch of bare earth and replenished every week.