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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Breeding bird response to pine-grassland community restoration for red-cockaded woodpeckers Picoides borealis in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA

Published source details

Wilson C.W., Masters R.E. & Bukenhofer G.A. (1995) Breeding bird response to pine-grassland community restoration for red-cockaded woodpeckers. Journal of Wildlife Management, 59, 56-67


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use prescribed burning on pine forests Bird Conservation

A replicated controlled study in 33 pine-grassland stands in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA (Wilson et al. 1995), found that overall bird species richness was similar across a series of different managements aimed at red-cockaded woodpecker conservation. Bird densities were highest in the second growing season after both burning and midstorey and tree thinning, compared with those subject to only midstorey and tree thinning or untreated stands. Ground-nesting species were most abundant in untreated stands. Management appeared beneficial to several species of conservation concern e.g. Bachman's sparrow Peucaea aestivalis (formerly Aimophila aestivalis), as well as red-cockaded woodpeckers.

 

Thin trees within forests Bird Conservation

A replicated controlled study in 1992-1993 in 33 pine-grassland stands in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA (Wilson et al. 1995), found that overall bird species richness and abundances were similar in stands with tree thinning, compared to control stands. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.

 

Manually control or remove midstorey and ground-level vegetation (including mowing, chaining, cutting etc) in forests Bird Conservation

A replicated controlled study in 1992-3 in 33 pine-grassland stands in Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas, USA (Wilson et al. 1995), found that overall bird species richness and abundances were similar in stands with midstorey thinning, compared to control stands. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.