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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A review of techniques for reducing fish predation by double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus at aquaculture facilities in southeastern USA

Published source details

Mott D.F. & Boyd F.L. (1995) A review of techniques for preventing cormorant depredations at aquaculture facilities in the southeastern United States. Colonial Waterbirds, 176-180


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Disturb birds at roosts Bird Conservation

A 1995 review assessed effectiveness of techniques used to prevent double-crested cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus predation at aquaculture facilities in the Mississippi delta region, USA (Mott & Boyd 1995), and concluded that disturbing birds at their roosts was more effective than scaring birds from fish farms during the day, with one study finding a 75-90% reduction in cormorant numbers foraging in the area after disturbance.

 

Use netting to exclude fish-eating birds Bird Conservation

A 1995 review assessed effectiveness of techniques used to prevent double-crested cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus predation at aquaculture facilities in the Mississippi delta region, USA (Mott & Boyd 1995), and concluded that excluding birds using netting or wires was an effective way to reduce damage.

 

Scare birds from fish farms Bird Conservation

A 1995 review assessed effectiveness of techniques used to prevent double-crested cormorant Phalacrocorax auritus predation at aquaculture facilities in the Mississippi delta region, USA (Mott & Boyd 1995), and concluded that there was little good evidence for what worked and what did not. Pyrotechnics, human effigies, gas cannons, and live ammunition have been used with varying degrees of success in frightening cormorants, but the authors warn that birds can become habituated to them.