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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: A systematic review to assess if predator control is an effective strategy for enhancing bird populations

Published source details

Smith R.K., Pullin A.S., Stewart G.B. & Sutherland W.J. (2010) Effectiveness of predator removal for enhancing bird populations. Conservation Biology, 24, 820-829


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Remove or control predators to enhance bird populations and communities Bird Conservation

A 2010 systematic review (Smith et al. 2010) found that removing predators tended to lead to increased reproductive success (hatching and fledging success) and breeding populations in birds. On mainlands, but not islands, predator removal also tended to increase post-breeding population size. Whether predators were native or not, the population trend of the bird population and whether the species was migratory or a game species did not affect responses to predator removal.

 

Control predatory mammals and birds (foxes, crows, stoats and weasels) Farmland Conservation

A 2010 global systematic review covering habitats including European farmland (Smith et al. 2010) found that removing predators tended to lead to increased reproductive (hatching and fledging success) success and breeding populations in birds. On mainlands, but not islands, predator removal also tended to increase post-breeding population size. Whether predators were native or not, the population trend of the bird population and whether the species was migratory or a game species did not affect responses to predator removal.