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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Grazing exclusion as a conservation measure in a temperate native grassland near Burra, South Australia

Published source details

Souter N.J. & Milne T. (2009) Grazing exclusion as a conservation measure in a South Australian temperate native grassland. Grassland Science, 55, 79-88


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1997–2000 in grassland in South Australia found fewer native plant species in plots with grazers excluded, compared to grazed plots. There was no difference in the number of non-native species. Ungrazed plots had higher cover of two grass species in most years. Plants: Fewer native species were found in ungrazed plots, compared to grazed plots, in three of four years (1.4–2.1 vs 2.0–2.5 species/quadrat). There was no difference in the number of non-native species (2.4–4.8 species/quadrat). Cover of Austrostipa sp. (a native grass) was higher in ungrazed plots, compared to grazed plots, in all years (18–31% vs 7–16% cover). Cover of Avena barbata (a non-native grass) was higher in ungrazed plots in the last two years of the study (15% vs 6–7%) and no different from grazed plots in the first two (4–13%). Total plant cover was higher in ungrazed, compared to grazed plots (data not provided). There were no differences in the presence or absence of different species between ungrazed and grazed plots. Methods: Six 50 x 50 m plots were established in November 1997. Half were fenced to exclude grazers and half were grazed by combinations of sheep, cattle, and alpacas Vicugna pacos. Vegetation was monitored in twenty-five 1 x 1 m quadrats in each plot in November–December each year.