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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Artificial incubation and hand-rearing of captive-bred Abdim's stork Ciconia abdimii chicks at Audubon Park Zoo, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Published source details

Farnell G. & Shannon P.W. (1987) The breeding of Abdim's storks at the Audubon Park Zoo. Colonial Waterbirds, 10, 251-254


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Artificially incubate and hand-rear storks and ibises in captivity Bird Conservation

A small study the Audubon Park Zoo, New Orleans, USA, in 1983 (Farnell & Shannon 1987) found that a pair of Abdim’s storks Ciconia abdimii successfully bred in captivity (see ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’), producing two eggs which were artificially incubated and hand-reared. The two chicks successfully integrated with the captive population and displayed normal behaviours. The eggs were incubated in a forced-air incubator at 36.9°C, moved to a 34°C brooder after hatching, with the temperature gradually reduced to 26°C by the time chicks were four weeks old. Hand-rearing consisted of seven feeds a day until four weeks old, when they were fed three times a day and then once a day from seven weeks old. Food consisted of commercial bird-of-prey food, fish, insects and yoghurt.

 

Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations of storks and ibises Bird Conservation

A small study at the Audubon Park Zoo, New Orleans, USA, in 1983 (Farnell & Shannon 1987) found that a pair of Abdim’s storks, Ciconia abdimii, successfully bred in captivity. However, they did not re-nest following the removal of two eggs for artificial incubation. This study is also discussed in ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.