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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Impact of Arctic fox Alopex lagopus eradication on black oystercatchers Haematopus bachmani and pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba nesting on two of the outer Shumagin Islands, Alaska, USA

Published source details

Byrd G.V., Bailey E.P. & Stahl W. (1997) Restoration of island populations of black oystercatchers and pigeon guillemots by removing introducing foxes. Colonial Waterbirds, 20, 253-260


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Control mammalian predators on islands for waders Bird Conservation

A controlled before-and-after on Simeonof (4,000 ha) and Chernabura (3,000 ha) Islands in the Shumagin Islands, Alaska (Byrd et al. 1997), found that the probable breeding populations of black oystercatchers Haematopus bachmani increased following the eradication of introduced arctic foxes Alopex lagopus (Simeonof: four pairs in 1994 vs. five in 1995; Chernabura: three and five pairs). Total estimated population increased on Simeonof (34 to 41 birds) but decreased on Chernabura (25 to 19 birds). Oystercatcher densities were significantly lower than on islands without foxes.

 

Control mammalian predators on islands for seabirds Bird Conservation

A controlled before-and-after study on Simeonof (4,000 ha) and Chernabura (3,000 ha) Islands in the Shumagin Islands, Alaska (Byrd et al. 1997) found that the average number of pigeon guillemots Cepphus columba recorded increased from 28 to 46 individuals on Chernabura, between 1994 and 1995, following the eradication of introduced arctic foxes Alopex lagopus. There was no increase on Simeonof Island, with an average of four recorded in both years. Guillemot densities were significantly lower than on islands without foxes.