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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effects of cattle grazing on blue oak Quercus douglasii seedlings in hardwood rangeland at Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center, California, USA

Published source details

Hall L.M., George M.R., McCreary D.D. & Adams T.E. (1992) Effects of cattle grazing on blue oak seedling damage and survival. Journal of Range Management, 45, 503-506


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Other biodiversity: Use seasonal grazing Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1989–1991 in grasslands in north-central California, USA, found higher survival of, and less damage to, oak seedlings in plots grazed in winter, compared to plots grazed in spring or summer. Plants: More blue oak Quercus douglasii seedlings survived in winter-grazed plots, compared to spring- or summer-grazed plots (46–50% vs 7–29% survival). Seedlings in winter-grazed plots were less likely to be damaged by browsing or trampling, compared to those in spring- or summer-grazed plots (12–52% vs 40–93% of seedlings damaged). Methods: In December 1989, oak seedlings were planted in three pastures, each containing nine plots grazed for a week each in winter (January–February), spring (April), or summer (June–July), at one of three grazing intensities. Each plot received 24 seedlings (720 in total), of which half had the area around them treated with glyphosate herbicide to reduce competition from grass.

 

Other biodiversity: Use fewer grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1989–1991 in grasslands in north-central California, USA, found that blue oak Quercus douglasii seedlings survived at similar rates but had less damage from cattle when planted in plots grazed by cattle at lower densities. Plants: Survival of seedlings after 15 months did not differ between plots grazed at low, medium, or high densities (7–50% survival). Fewer seedlings were damaged by browsing and trampling as grazer densities decreased (12–57%, 38–74%, and 52–93% of seedlings damaged in low, medium, and high density plots, respectively). Methods: In December 1989, oak seedlings were planted in three pastures, each containing nine plots grazed for a week each in winter, spring, or summer with low, medium and high densities of cattle (2.5, 7.5, and 15 animals/ha, respectively). Each plot received 24 seedlings (720 in total), of which half had the area around them treated with glyphosate herbicide to reduce competition from grass.

 

Other biodiversity: Exclude grazers Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1989–1991 in grasslands in north-central California, USA, found few differences in the survival of, or damage to, blue oak Quercus douglasii seedlings planted in pastures from which cattle were excluded, compared to grazed pastures. Plants: There were no differences in 15-month survival between seedlings planted in ungrazed plots, compared to those grazed by cattle in spring or summer (9–24% survival). Seedlings had lower survival in ungrazed plots, compared to winter grazed plots (15% vs 46%). The proportion of seedlings damaged by browsing or trampling did not differ between ungrazed and grazed plots (0–85% damaged). Methods: In December 1989, oak seedlings were planted in three pastures, each containing ten plots: one with cattle excluded and nine grazed for a week each at different intensities and at different times. Ungrazed plots were accessible to wild herbivores. Each plot received 24 seedlings (720 in total), of which half had the area around them treated with glyphosate herbicide to reduce competition from grass.