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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Survival rates of captive- and wild-bred Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus in a re-introduced population at Bambous mountain range, Mauritius

Published source details

Nicoll M.A.C., Jones C.G. & Norris K. (2004) Comparison of survival rates of captive-reared and wild-bred Mauritius kestrels (Falco punctatus) in a re-introduced population. Biological Conservation, 118, 539-548


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Foster eggs or chicks of raptors with wild conspecifics Bird Conservation

A replicated 2004 study of a Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus release programme (Nicoll et al. 2004) found no difference in survival between birds ‘hacked’ as fledglings (and provided with supplementary food until independence), those fostered to wild breeding pairs or wild-bred birds (80% for 42 fostered birds; 80% for 46 hacked birds and 75% for 284 wild-bred birds). This study is discussed in detail in ‘Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations’.

 

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of raptors Bird Conservation

A 2004 review (Nicoll et al. 2004) of the same Mauritius kestrel Falco punctatus release programme as in Cade & Jones 1993, between 1987 and 2001  found that survival estimates for adult kestrels were similar, irrespective of whether they were ‘hacked’ as fledglings (and provided with supplementary food until independence), or fostered to wild breeding pairs or wild-bred (80% for 42 fostered birds; 80% for 46 hacked birds and 75% for 284 wild-bred birds). Survival estimates for juvenile kestrels were far more variable, but did not appear to differ between treatments (36-72% for hacked, 23-100% for fostered and 31-80% for wild-bred). A total of 40 breeding pairs were monitored in 2000-1. Overall, the wild kestrel population across Mauritius reached an estimated 500 to 800 individuals in 2000, compared to five individuals in 1973.