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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of nest boxes by 29 species of bee and wasp in the Hainich National Park, Thüringen, Germany

Published source details

, S. Tscharntke T., Scherber C., , & Steffan-Dewenter I. (2009) Canopy vs. understorey: Does tree diversity affect bee and wasp communities and their natural enemies across forest strata? Forest Ecology and Management, 258, 609-615


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Sobek et al. (2009) document three species of host bee (Hylaeus communis, Hylaeus confusus and Megachile ligniseca) and one parasitic bee (Coelioxys alata) using twelve reed stem nest boxes placed at each of 12 broadleaf woodland sites in the Hainich National Park, Thuringia, Germany. Bees made up only 9% of host cells (347 cells), with the majority of nest occupants being wasps. The abundance of nesting insects was higher in nest boxes in the canopy than in nest boxes mounted on wooden posts at chest height.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Sobek et al. (2009) record parasitism rates of 16% of solitary bee and wasp cells made in canopy nest boxes and 13% of cells in understorey nest boxes, during a five-month study in Hainich National Park, a semi-natural broadleaf forest in Thuringia, Germany.