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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Captive breeding of houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata and trial release of captive-bred individuals in the Mahazat as-Sayd reserve, Makkah, Saudi Arabia

Published source details

Seddon P.J., Saint Jalme M., van Heezik Y., Paillat P., Gaucher P. & Combreau O. (1995) Restoration of houbara bustard populations in Saudi Arabia: developments and future directions. Oryx, 29, 136-142


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Artificially incubate and hand-rear bustards in captivity Bird Conservation

A review of a houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii captive breeding programme in Saudi Arabia (1) between 1989 and 1993 found that removing eggs from females to artificially incubate them increased the number of eggs produced from one to four eggs/year for wild birds to nearly nine eggs/female. This study is also discussed in ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Use artificial insemination in captive breeding’ and ‘Release captive-bred individuals’.

 

Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations of bustards Bird Conservation

A review of a houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii, captive breeding programme in Saudi Arabia, starting in 1986 (Seddon et al. 1995) found that the captive population first bred in 1989, producing 17 chicks. In 1992, 138 chicks hatched, establishing a self-sustaining captive population. In 1993, 285 chicks hatched from 75 females. However, 18% of females never became accustomed to captivity and did not lay eggs. The captive population began as 103 chicks from Pakistan and 129 from the African subspecies C. u. undulata, all collected between 1986 and 1988. This study is also discussed in ‘Release captive-bred individuals’, ‘Use artificial insemination in captive breeding’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

 

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of bustards Bird Conservation

A review of a captive breeding programme in southwest Saudi Arabia (Seddon et al. 1995) reported that, of six houbara bustards Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii released in three separate trials in 1991-2, only two survived, of which one was recaptured. This programme is discussed in more detail in ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, ‘Use artificial insemination in captive breeding’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

 

Use artificial insemination in captive breeding Bird Conservation

A review of a houbara bustard Chlamydotis undulata macqueenii captive breeding programme in Saudi Arabia (Seddon et al. 1995) found that artificial insemination increased fertility rates from 50% to 85% between 1989 and 1993. At least 440 chicks were hatched during the study period. This study is also discussed in ‘Use captive breeding to increase or maintain populations’, Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’ and ‘Release captive-bred individuals’.