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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Response of species richness of vascular plants, grasshoppers, bees and spiders to agri-environment schemes in hay meadows in Switzerland

Published source details

Knop E., Kliejn D., Herzog F. & Schmid B. (2006) Effectiveness of the Swiss agri-environment scheme in promoting diversity. Journal of Applied Ecology, 43, 120-127


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Reduce the intensity of farmland meadow management Bee Conservation

In a replicated trial in Switzerland (Knop et al. 2006), 21 hay meadows managed under the 'Ecological Compensation Areas' agri-environment scheme for three to 10 years had more species of wild bee and more individual wild bees than 21 paired conventionally managed hay meadows. There were 13 species/field, 11 individuals/survey under the agri-environment schemes, compared to 11 species/field and 8 individuals/survey on conventional meadows. This agri-environment scheme requires a postponed first cut, in June or later, and no additions of fertilizer or pesticide to the meadow, although in the study three of the trial meadows were fertilized a little, despite the regulations.

Reduce management intensity on permanent grasslands (several interventions at once) Farmland Conservation

A replicated trial with paired sites in Switzerland (Knop et al. 2006) (same study as (Kleijn et al. 2006)) found 21 hay meadows managed under the Ecological Compensation Areas agri-environment scheme for three to 10 years had more species of plant, wild bee (Apidae) and grasshopper (Orthoptera) than 21 paired conventionally managed hay meadows. There were 13 wild bee species/field, 11 individual bees/survey under the agri-environment schemes, compared to 11 bee species/field and 8 individuals/survey on conventional meadows. This agri-environment scheme requires a postponed first cut, in June or later, and no additions of fertilizer or pesticide to the meadow, although in the study three of the trial meadows were fertilized a little, despite the regulations.