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Individual study: Establishment of a new breeding colony of Gould's petrel Pterodroma leucoptera through provision of artificial nest burrows and translocation of nestlings, Boondelbah Island, New South Wales, Australia

Published source details

Priddel D., Carlile N. & Wheeler R. (2006) Establishment of a new breeding colony of Gould's petrel Pterodroma leucoptera leucoptera through the creation of artificial nesting habitat and the translocation of nestlings. Biological Conservation, 128, 553-563


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate petrels and shearwaters Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in New South Wales, Australia (Priddel et al. 2006), found that a new breeding colony of Gould’s petrels Pterodroma leucoptera leucoptera was successfully established on Boondelbah Island, following the translocation of 100 nestlings in 1999 (95 fledging) and 100 in 2000 (100 fledging) from Cabbage Tree Island. In 2003-4, 41 petrels (both translocated and unknown birds) were recorded on the island, with 21 breeding pairs producing a total of 24 eggs and 14 fledglings in five years since the translocations. No negative impact was recorded on the productivity of the Cabbage Tree Island population. Nestlings were translocated from Cabbage Tree Island (1.4 km away) when they had reached their maximum weight but before they emerged from burrows (11-28 days old in 1999, 11-22 days old in 2000). They were moved to artificial nests (details in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’) and fed fish and squid until they stopped feeding.

 

Provide artificial nesting sites for burrow-nesting seabirds Bird Conservation

A replicated study on Boondelbah Island, New South Wales, Australia (Priddel et al. 2006), found that 98% of Gould’s petrel Pterodroma leucoptera leucoptera chicks fledged successfully from artificial nests, after being translocated from Cabbage Tree Island, 1.4 km away, leading to the establishment of a new breeding colony. One hundred plastic boxes of the type described in Priddel & Carlile 1995  were installed over a 150 m2 and chicks placed directly in them and supplied with food. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Translocate individuals’.