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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Effect of forest management for red-cockaded woodpeckers Picoides borealis on species richness and abundance of bird species at Angelina National Forest, Texas, USA

Published source details

Conner R.N., Shackelford C.E., Schaefer R.R., Saenz D. & Rudolph D.C. (2002) Avian community response to southern pine ecosystem restoration for red-cockaded woodpeckers. Wilson Bulletin, 114, 324-332


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Thin trees within forests Bird Conservation

A replicated, controlled paired sites study in 1995-1997 in pine forests in Angelina National Forest, Texas, USA (Conner et al. 2002), found that spring bird species richness and abundances were significantly higher in plots managed for red-cockaded woodpecker, compared to unmanaged plots. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Use prescribed burning’.

 

Use prescribed burning on pine forests Bird Conservation

A replicated, paired, controlled study in 1995-1997 in two pine Pinus spp. habitats at Angelina National Forest, Texas, USA (Conner et al. 2002), found that bird species richness and abundances in spring were significantly higher in plots managed for red-cockaded woodpecker, compared to unmanaged plots (longleaf pine forests: 7 species and 22 individuals in managed forests vs. 6 and 13 in controls; loblolly pine-shortleaf pine P. echinata forests: 10 species and 32 individuals vs. 7 and 20). Differences were also present in loblolly-shortleaf, but not longleaf pine forests during winter (loblolly-shortleaf forests: 8 species and 42 individuals vs. 5 and 28; longleaf: 7 and 30 vs. 7 and 26). Management consisted of prescribed burning, mechanical mid-storey vegetation removal and thinning of pine trees.