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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of reed stem nest boxes by solitary bees and wasps near Göttingen, Lower Saxony, Germany

Published source details

Steffan-Dewenter I. (2002) Landscape context affects trap-nesting bees, wasps, and their natural enemies. Ecological Entomology, 27, 631-637


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide nest boxes for bees (solitary bees or bumblebees) Farmland Conservation

A replicated trial in 1997 of 120 reed Phragmites australis stem nest boxes at 15 different agricultural sites near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany (Steffan-Dewenter 2002) (same study as (Gathmann & Tscharntke 2002)) found the boxes were occupied by 11 species of bee (Apidae). The red mason bee Osmia rufa and the common yellow face bee Hylaeus communis were the most widespread and common nest box occupants in this study. Fourteen percent of bee brood cells were attacked by natural enemies (brood parasites, parasitoids or predators). Nest boxes consisted of 150-180 stem sections of common reed, with diameters of 2-10 mm, cut 20 cm-long and put in 10.5 cm diameter plastic tubes. Reed-filled tubes were attached to wooden posts 1-1.2 m above the ground, with four nest boxes to a post. Two posts (eight nest boxes) were placed at 15 different sites from April to October. In October, occupied reeds were cut open and the number of brood cells in each stem counted. Occupants were reared in the laboratory and identified to species where possible.

 

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

A trial of 120 reed stem nest boxes at 15 different agricultural sites near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany in 1997 found the boxes occupied by 11 species of bee (Steffan-Dewenter 2002). The red mason bee Osmia rufa and the common yellow face bee Hylaeus communis were the most widespread and common nest box occupants in this study.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

In a trial of 120 reed stem next boxes in lower Saxony, Germany in 1997 (Steffan-Dewenter 2002), 14% of bee brood cells were attacked by natural enemies (brood parasites, parasitoids or predators).