Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of ringing recovery data to assess the potential impact of protective legislation on survival of common kestrels Falco tinnunculus in Denmark

Published source details

Noer H. & Secher H. (1983) Survival of Danish kestrels Falco tinnunculus in relation to protection of birds of prey. Ornis Scandinavica, 14, 104-114


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study examining 524 kestrels Falco tinnunculus recovered during 1917-80 in Denmark (Noer & Secher 1983) found that estimated survival rates of birds ringed as chicks increased during 1967-72 (66% annual survival) compared to 1945-66 (50%), following the introduction of legal protection for all birds of prey in 1967. However, the increase in survival rate following kestrel-specific legislation in 1926 was insignificant (45% for 1917-25 vs. 55% for 1926-39) and there was a significant fall in 1973-80 (to 53%). There were similar (although insignificant) patterns for birds ringed as juveniles or adults. There were significant decreases in the proportion of recoveries that were shot following each piece of legislation, from 1917-25 (59% of 29) to 1926-39 (14% of 35) and again from 1945-66 (17% of 76) to 1976-80 (2% of 192).

 

Enforce legislation to protect birds against persecution Farmland Conservation

A before-and-after study examining 524 common kestrels Falco tinnunculus recovered during 1917-1980 in Denmark (Noer & Secher 1983) found that estimated survival rates of birds ringed as chicks increased during 1967-1972 (66% annual survival) compared to 1945-1966 (50%), following the introduction of legal protection for all birds of prey in 1967. However, the increase in survival rate following kestrel-specific legislation in 1926 was insignificant (45% for 1917-1925 vs 55% for 1926-1939) and there was a significant fall in 1973-1980 (to 53%). There were similar (although insignificant) patterns for birds ringed as juveniles or adults. There were significant decreases in the proportion of recoveries that were shot following each piece of legislation, from 1917-1925 (59% of 29) to 1926-1939 (14% of 35) and again from 1945-1966 (17% of 76) to 1976-1980 (2% of 192).