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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Successful eradication of brown rats Rattus norvegicus from Breaksea Island, Southland, New Zealand

Published source details

Taylor R.H. & Thomas B.W. (1993) Rats eradicated from rugged Breaksea Island (170 ha), Fiordland, New Zealand. Biological Conservation, 65, 191-198


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Do birds take bait designed for pest control? Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study on Breaksea Island (170 ha), South Island, New Zealand (Taylor & Thomas 1993) found that there was no significant difference in the number of South Island robins Petroica australis australis counted in 1987, prior to a rat eradication campaign, compared to after the eradication of rats in 1988 and 1989 (130 robins in 1987, 127 and 129 in 1988 and 1989 respectively; 192 birds counted at 133 bait stations in 1988, 194 at 140 stations in 1989). Rats were eradicated using brodifacoum baits in both briquettes and plastic bags. The lack of change in the robin population implies that birds were not adversely affected by the poisoning and did not take the bait.

 

Control mammalian predators on islands for songbirds Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in 1987-9 on Breaksea Island (170 ha), South Island, New Zealand (Taylor & Thomas 1993) found an almost identical number of South Island robins Petroica australis australis after a rat eradication programme as before. This study is discussed in detail in ‘Do birds take bait designed for pest control?’.