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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Management efforts for the conservation of common tern Sterna hirundo colonies near Port Colborne and at Eastern Headland, Ontario, Canada

Published source details

Morris R.D., Blokpoel H. & Tessier G.D. (1992) Management efforts for the conservation of common tern Sterna hirundo colonies in the Great Lakes: two case histories. Biological Conservation, 60, 7-14


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Replace nesting substrate following severe weather Bird Conservation

Two before-and-after studies at two common tern Sterna hirundo colonies between 1977-89 in Ontario, Canada (Morris et al. 1992), found the nesting population increased at one colony but decreased at another following a combination of interventions, including the replacement of nesting substrate following flooding. Other interventions included: erecting signs highlighting the presence of nesting birds, vegetation control, preventing gulls Larus spp. from nesting, destroying gull nests and shooting particular ring-billed gulls L. delawarensis that were heavily predating tern eggs. Gulls were only culled at the site with population increase, whilst the authors attribute declines to continued high levels of disturbance, vegetation growth and mammalian predators.

 

Reduce inter-specific competition for nest sites of ground nesting seabirds by removing competitor species Bird Conservation

Two before-and-after studies in 1977-89 at two common tern Sterna hirundo colonies in Lake Ontario, Canada (Morris et al. 1992), found that the nesting population increased at one colony but decreased at the second following the use of several interventions, including the exclusion of ring-billed gulls Larus delawarensis. This study is discussed in ‘Replace nesting substrate following severe weather’.

 

Use signs and access restrictions to reduce disturbance at nest sites Bird Conservation

Two before-and-after studies in 1977-89 at two common tern Sterna hirundo colonies in Lake Ontario, Canada (Morris et al. 1992), found that the nesting population increased at one colony but decreased at the second following the use of several interventions, including the erection of signs highlighting the presence of nesting birds. This study is discussed in ‘Replace nesting substrate following severe weather’.

 

Remove vegetation to create nesting areas Bird Conservation

Two before-and-after studies in 1977-89 at two common tern Sterna hirundo colonies in Lake Ontario, Canada (Morris et al. 1992), found that the nesting population increased at one colony but decreased at the second following the use of several interventions, including the removal of vegetation from the nesting area. This study is discussed in ‘Replace nesting substrate following severe weather’.

 

Control avian predators on islands Bird Conservation

A before-and-after studies during 1977-89 at a common tern Sterna hirundo colony in Lake Ontario, Canada (Morris et al. 1992), found the nesting population increased at one colony but decreased at another following several interventions, including the control of particular ring-billed gulls L. delawarensis that were heavily predating tern eggs. This study is discussed in ‘Replace nesting substrate following severe weather’.