Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Population trends of griffon vulture Gyps fulvus on the western slope of the Spanish Pyrenees in relation to conservation measures in northern Spain

Published source details

Donázar J.A. & Fernández C. (1990) Population trends of the griffon vulture Gyps fulvus in Northern Spain between 1969 and 1989 in relation to conservation measures. Biological Conservation, 53, 83-91


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Legally protect habitats Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in the western Pyrenees, Spain (Donázar & Fernández 1990), found that the population of griffon vultures Gyps fulvus increased from 282 pairs (in 23 colonies) in 1969-75 to 1,097 pairs (46 colonies) in 1989 following the initiation of multiple conservation interventions including the creation of reserves at nine breeding colonies (one in 1976, eight in 1987). This study is also discussed in more detail in ‘Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations’, ‘Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals’ and ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’.

Provide supplementary food for vultures to increase adult survival Bird Conservation

A before-and-after between 1969 and 1989 in the western Pyrenees, Spain (Donazar & Fernandez 1990), found that the population of griffon vultures Gyps fulvus increased from 282 pairs (in 23 colonies) in 1969-75 to 1,097 pairs (46 colonies) in 1989 following the initiation of multiple conservation interventions including the installation of feeding stations between 1969 and 1979. However, the authors note that only two of six feeding stations were used by vultures and food was never apparently a limiting factor for the population in the study area. This study is also discussed in ‘Habitat protection’, ‘Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals’ and ‘Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations’.

 

Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals for birds Bird Conservation

A before-and-after between 1969 and 1989 in the western Pyrenees, Spain (Donazar & Frenandez 1990), found that the population of griffon vultures Gyps fulvus increased from 282 pairs (in 23 colonies) in 1969-75 to 1,097 pairs (46 colonies) in 1989 following the initiation of multiple conservation interventions including the banning of strychnine, a major cause of vulture mortality, in 1984. Additional surveys in 1979 and 1984 found 364 pairs (in 26 colonies), 589 pairs (32 colonies) respectively. This study is also discussed in ‘Habitat protection’, ‘Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations’ and ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’.

 

Use legislative regulation to protect wild populations Bird Conservation

A before-and-after study in the western Pyrenees, Spain (Donazar & Fernandez 1990), found that the population of griffon vultures Gyps fulvus increased from 282 pairs (in 23 colonies) in 1969-75 to 1,097 pairs (46 colonies) in 1989 following the initiation of multiple conservation interventions including: legal protection (in 1973); the creation of a reserve at nine breeding colonies (one in 1976, eight in 1987); the banning of strychnine (in 1984); and the installation of feeding stations between 1969 and 1979. Surveys in 1979 and 1984 found 364 pairs (in 26 colonies), and 589 pairs (32 colonies) respectively. This study is also discussed in ‘Habitat protection’, ‘Restrict certain pesticides or other agricultural chemicals’ and ‘Provide supplementary food to increase adult survival’.