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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Preference for wooden and reed stem nest boxes in the red mason bee Osmia rufa near Swadzim, Poznan County, Poland

Published source details

Wilkaniec Z. & Giejdasz K. (2003) Suitability of nesting substrates for the cavity-nesting bee Osmia rufa. Journal of Apicultural Research, 42, 29-31


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide nest boxes for bees (solitary bees or bumblebees) Farmland Conservation

A replicated study in 2000 and 2001 at an agricultural experimental station in Poznan County, Poland (Wilkaniec & Gieidasz 2003) tested six different nesting materials for the red mason bee Osmia rufa and found all materials were used by female bees, but the highest production of bees per nest was from reed Phragmites australis stems (3.5 bees/nest in 1999) or wood (7.2 bees/nest in 2000). Nests in paper tubes were all parasitized. Nests in plastic were well occupied (80-100%) but had a low success rate (0.2-1.8 bees/nest), partly due to mould. For each trial, 150 nests of each of the following materials were tested: reed stems, plastic tubes, paper tubes (bundles), wood, cork (grooved boards joined together in blocks), and holes drilled into wood, lined with printer acetate.

 

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Six different nesting materials for the red mason bee Osmia rufa were tested at an agricultural experimental station in Poznan County, Poland, in 2000 and 2001 (Wilkaniec & Giejdasz 2003). For each trial, 150 nests of each of the following materials were tested: reed stems, plastic tubes, paper tubes (bundles), wood, cork (grooved boards joined together in blocks), and holes drilled into wood, lined with printer acetate. All materials were used by female bees, but the highest production of bees per nest was from reed stems (3.5 bees/nest in 1999) or wood (7.2 bees/nest in 2000). Nests in paper tubes were all parasitized. Nests in plastic were well occupied (80-100%) but had a low success rate (0.2-1.8 bees/nest), partly due to mould.