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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of drilled wood nest boxes by resin-collecting solitary bees Megachile spp. around Tucson, Arizona, USA

Published source details

Armbrust E.A. (2004) Resource use and nesting behaviour of Megachile prosopidis and M.chilopsidis with notes on M.dischorina (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 77, 89-98


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Three species of wild megachilid bee (Megachile spp.) nested in boxes made from blocks of pine wood drilled with 14 mm long, 8 mm diameter holes, in a small replicated trial in Arizona USA (Armbrust 2004). Three sites were in the Tucson Mountains, one site on undeveloped land within Tucson city. Four nest boxes, each with 33 holes, were placed at each site. Overall 34% of available nest holes were filled between May and July 2001, but only six nests (4.5% of the available holes) were constructed in boxes at the urban site.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Armbrust (2004) placed four nest boxes made from blocks of pine wood drilled with 14 mm long, 8 mm diameter holes at each of four sites in or near Tucson, Arizona, USA for one summer. Overall, 34% of nest holes were filled, by three species of Megachilidae. Of the filled nests examined, 27% were subsequently occupied by parasites or predators.