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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Providing artificial nest sites for the subtropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Haryana, India

Published source details

Sihag R.C. (1993) Behaviour and ecology of the subtropical bee Xylocopa fenestrata F. 7. Nest preferences and response to nest translocation. Journal of Apicultural Research, 32, 102-108


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Translocate solitary bees Bee Conservation

A study of the subtropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata on agricultural land in Haryana, India, found that populations could be translocated to a site 3 km away, if this was done with immature stages sealed within hollow stems (Sihag 1993). Of 90 translocated adult bees, only three remained at the new site. Around 40% of bees translocated as young (90 stems moved with young bees inside) stayed after emergence at the new site; 63-70% of these translocated females stayed and began provisioning nests, whereas most males left the site after territorial fights.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

The subtropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata, a valuable pollinator of cucurbits and other plants, has been shown to nest readily in cut stems of castor Ricinis communis or sarkanda Arundo sp. bundled together (Sihag 1993a). In a trial on agricultural land in Haryanar, India, these bees strongly preferred stems cut to 23-30 cm long, with an internal diameter of 10-12 mm. The number of occupied stems increased from 120 in the first year (1984) to 350 two years later (1986), from a total of 20,000 stems placed out over three years.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Numbers of the subtropical carpenter bee Xylocopa fenestrata nesting in cut stems of castor Ricinis communis or sarkanda Arundo sp. bundled together increased from 120 in the first year (1984) to 350 two years later (1986), in a trial on agricultural land in Haryanar, India (Sihag 1993a).