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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of artificial nests by native solitary bees and wasps in south-west and central Germany

Published source details

Tscharntke T., , & Steffan-Dewenter I. (1998) Bioindication using trap-nesting bees and wasps and their natural enemies: community structure and interactions. Journal of Applied Ecology, 35, 708-719


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide nest boxes for bees (solitary bees or bumblebees) Farmland Conservation

A review of a series of four trials (two (Gathmann et al. 1994, Gathmann & Tscharntke 1997) already described above) between 1990 and 1996 in Germany (Tscharntke et al. 1998) found 33 bee species (Apidae) (not including parasitic bees) used reed Phragmites australis bundles placed in tins or plastic tubes attached to wooden posts across a variety of agricultural and semi-natural habitats including orchard meadows, old hay meadows, set-aside fields, field margins and chalk grasslands. Two studies documented predation and parasitism rates in reed bundles in tins or plastic tubes attached to wooden posts in various semi-natural and agricultural habitats. The average percentage killed by predators or parasites was 21% for bees or 28% for wasps on average.

 

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

A series of four trials between 1990 and 1996 in Germany documented uptake of reed bundles placed in tins or plastic tubes attached to wooden posts (Tscharntke et al. 1998). Across a variety of agricultural and semi-natural habitats including orchard meadows, old hay meadows, set-aside fields, field margins and chalk grasslands, a total of 33 bee species (not including parasitic bees) used the nests.

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

Two studies between 1990 and 1996 in Germany documented predation and parasitism rates in reed bundles in tins or plastic tubes attached to wooden posts in various semi-natural and agricultural habitats (reported in Tscharntke et al. 1998). The percentage of bees and wasps killed by predators or parasites was 21 or 28% on average.