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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Use of reed stem nests by the solitary bee Osmia rufa near Göttingen, Niedersachen, Germany

Published source details

Steffan-Dewenter I. & Schiele S. (2004) Nest site fidelity, body weight and population size of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), evaluated by mark-recapture experiments. Entomologia Generalis, 27, 123-131


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Provide nest boxes for bees (solitary bees or bumblebees) Farmland Conservation

A replicated study in 1998 of 12 trap nests in each of five orchard meadows near Göttingen, Germany (Steffan-Dewenter & Schiele 2004) found trap nests (bundles of common reed Phragmites australis stems) were used as nest sites by the red mason bee Osmia rufa. Three years later, in autumn 2001, a total of 974 newly developed females were counted in 60 such nests and 222 of them were observed re-stocking nests. Bundles of common reed stems (approximately 153 stems, cut 15-20 cm-long) in 10-13 cm diameter plastic tubes, attached to 1.5 m-long wooden posts in groups of four were placed in five orchard meadows. In autumn 2001, all female adults inside the nests were marked with a plastic bee marker. The stems were closed again and stored until spring 2002, when they were placed in emergence boxes on the posts they came from. Trap nests were observed for two or three 30-60 minute periods from 16 to 22 May 2002.

 

Provide artificial nest sites for solitary bees Bee Conservation

In 1998, Steffan-Dewenter & Schiele (2004) placed bundles of common reed stems (153 stems per bundle, cut 15-20 cm long) in 10-13 cm diameter plastic tubes, attached to wooden posts, in orchard meadows in Germany. These were used as nest sites by the red mason bee Osmia rufa. Three years later, in autumn 2001, a total of 974 newly developed females were counted in 60 such nests, over five orchard meadow sites.