Study

Establishment of a breeding colony of common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix following acoustic attraction and the translocation of chicks to Mana Island, Wellington, New Zealand

  • Published source details Miskelly C.M. & Taylor G.A. (2004) Establishment of a colony of common diving petrels (Pelecanoides urinatrix) by chick transfers and acoustic attraction. Emu, 104, 205-211

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Translocate petrels and shearwaters

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Artificially incubate and hand-rear seabirds in captivity

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Provide artificial nesting sites for burrow-nesting seabirds

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Translocate petrels and shearwaters

    A replicated study on Mana Island, North Island, New Zealand (Miskelly & Taylor 2004), found that 49% of 239 common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix fledged successfully after being translocated to the island in 1997-9 from two other islands and hand-reared (see ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’) in artificial nests (see ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’). The first breeding of translocated birds was recorded in 2000 and by 2003 there were 19 pairs in the colony (which had been empty until 1997). Vocalisations of petrels were also played on the island, see ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’.

     

  2. Artificially incubate and hand-rear seabirds in captivity

    A replicated study in November-December 1997-9 (Miskelly & Taylor 2004) found that 118 of 239 common diving petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix nestlings (49%) were successfully hand-reared after being translocated to Mana Island, New Zealand, from other offshore islands. Chicks were between four and eight weeks old when caught and fed a krill-based paste (also containing calcium and other supplements) with a 12 ml syringe either once (in 1997) or twice (1998-9) a day until fledged. Fledging rates were higher in 1997 (58% of 90 chicks) than 1998 (40% of 100) or 1999 (53% of 49), but these differences were not investigated statistically. Information on translocation success and other interventions are discussed in ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’, ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’ and ‘Translocate individuals’. This study describes a technique usually used in captivity being used in the wild.

     

  3. Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas

    A before-and-after study on Mana Island, North Island, New Zealand (Miskelly & Taylor 2004), found that a new nesting colony of common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix was established by playing vocalisations, providing artificial nesting burrows and translocating chicks. This study is discussed in ‘Translocate individuals’, ‘Provide artificial nests’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

     

  4. Provide artificial nesting sites for burrow-nesting seabirds

    A replicated study on Mana Island, North Island, New Zealand (Miskelly & Taylor 2004), found that 49% of 239 common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix fledged successfully after being translocated to the island in 1997-9 from two other islands and hand-reared in artificial nests. However, 94% of 53 breeding attempts on the island until 2003 were in natural burrows, rather than artificial nests. The nests consisted of two buried chambers (30 x 15 cm and 20 x 20 cm) reached by a 60 cm section of 10 cm diameter PVC pipe. This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’, ‘Use vocalisations to attract birds to safe areas’ and ‘Translocate individuals’.

     

Output references

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