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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Impact of reed cutting on density and nesting success of reed warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus and sedge warblers A. schoenobaenus in De Weerribben National Park, Overijssel, Netherlands

Published source details

Graveland J. (1999) Effects of reed cutting on density and breeding success of reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpacaeus and sedge warbler A. schoenobaenus. Journal of Avian Biology, 30, 469-482


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Mow or cut reedbeds Bird Conservation

A controlled study in 1993-1995 in an area of peat marsh in Overijssel, the Netherlands (Graveland 1999), found that reed warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus and sedge warblers A. schoenobaenus nested at significantly lower densities in areas of recently cut reedbed, compared to uncut areas (reed warblers: 0.8 nests/100 m of shore for cut areas vs. 2.0 nests/100 m for uncut; sedge warblers: 0.03 nests/100 m vs. 0.7 nests/100 m). There were no significant difference in the fledging success of unpredated nests in cut and uncut reed, but nest predation of reed warblers was higher in cut reed (33% predated in cut areas vs. 17% in uncut areas). There was no difference for sedge warblers (73% vs. 43%).