Study

Impact of intensive nest monitoring on the breeding success of Puerto Rican parrots Amazona vittata in the Caribbean National Forest, Puerto Rico

  • Published source details Lindsey G.D. (1992) Nest guarding from observation blinds: strategy for improving Puerto Rican parrot nest success. Journal of Field Ornithology, 63, 466-472

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Guard nests to increase nest success

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Repair/support nests to support breeding

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Guard nests to increase nest success

    A time-series study on nest success of Puerto Rican parrots Amazona vittata in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico, between 1973 and 1989 (Lindsey 1992) found that the nest success of 71 Puerto Rican parrot Amazona vittata nests was 66% following the instigation of intensive nest monitoring in 1973, compared with an estimated 11–26% success of 19 nests before nest guarding (1955-72) and a predicted 38% success in 1973-80 had guarding not occurred. Threats to nests included the natural deterioration of nest cavities, predation, exoparasites, poor parental care, unviable eggs (replaced with captive-bred eggs), poor growth or unsuccessful fledging of chicks, human intrusion (three nests) and competition from other pairs. Some nests were affected by multiple threats.

     

  2. Repair/support nests to support breeding

    A small study on nest success of Puerto Rican parrots Amazona vittata in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico, between 1973 and 1989 (Lindsey 1992) found that nest guarding and repair work by volunteers and biologists/technicians prevented the failure of nine nests in nest holes that had wet cavities, which, without repair, would have resulted in the eggs becoming chilled. A total of 71 nests were guarded. This study is also discussed in ‘Guard nests to increase nest success’.

     

Output references

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