Study

Survival of released and wild-bred griffon vultures Gyps fulvus following reintroduction in the Causse Méjean, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

  • Published source details Sarrazin F., Bagnolini C., Pinna J.L., Danchin E. & Clobert J. (1994) High survival estimates of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus fulvus) in a reintroduced population. The Auk, 111, 853-862

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release birds as adults or sub-adults, not juveniles

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce persecution or exploitation of species

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of vultures

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Release birds as adults or sub-adults, not juveniles

    A ten-year study of a griffon vulture Gyps fulvus reintroduction programme in river gorges in Aveyron, southern France (Sarrazin et al. 1994) found that annual survival rates were similar or higher for birds released as adults (74% in the first year after release and 98% from the second year onwards, 39 birds released), compared to those released as immature (75% during the first two years after release, 20 birds released). This study is also discussed in ‘Release captive-bred individuals’ and ‘Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce pressures on species’.

     

  2. Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce persecution or exploitation of species

    A ten-year study of a griffon vulture Gyps fulvus reintroduction programme in river gorges in Aveyron, southern France (Sarrazin et al. 1994) found that an education programme run at the same time appeared to reduce persecution of vultures. No shooting or poisoning was recorded in the study area and only a single nest was disturbed by a climber. In addition, farmers were reported to be leaving carcasses in fields more frequently, thus providing a source of food for the vultures. No details are provided on the education programme. The reintroduction programme itself is discussed in ‘Release captive-bred individuals’ and ‘Release birds as adult or subadults, not juveniles’.

     

  3. Release captive-bred individuals into the wild to restore or augment wild populations of vultures

    A replicated study over ten years of a griffon vulture Gyps fulvus reintroduction programme in river gorges in Aveyron, southern France (Sarrazin et al. 1996) found that 39 adult and 20 immature (less than four years old) birds released between 1980 and 1986 had high survival rates. Survival rates of the wild-bred offspring of the released birds were also high: 86% for the first three years of life and 99% from then on. Of the 18 marked vultures recovered dead between 1981 and 1991, 12 (67%) had died as a result of electrocution. Reproduction of the released birds is discussed in Bose & Sarrazin 2007, the effect of age at release is discussed in ‘Release birds as adult or sub-adults, not juveniles’ and the education programme that accompanied the releases is discussed in ‘Use education programmes and local engagement to help reduce pressures on species’.

     

Output references

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